Category Archives: Health

Learn About Healthy Eating

Being physically active and eating a healthy diet are keys to a healthy lifestyle. But what does “healthy eating” really mean? Healthy eating: Emphasizes vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products. Includes lean meat, poultry, fish, cooked dry beans and peas, eggs, and nuts. Is low in saturated fats, trans fats, salt, and added sugars. Read More


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4 Types of Exercise

Exercise and physical activity fall into four basic categories—endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility. Most people tend to focus on one activity or type of exercise and think they’re doing enough. Each type is different, though. Doing them all will give you more benefits. Mixing it up also helps to reduce boredom and cut your risk of injury. Though we’ve described Read More


Could a very low calorie diet ‘cure’ type 2 diabetes?

“Dieting for just eight weeks can reverse your diabetes,” the Daily Mail reports. A small study of 30 people with type 2 diabetes found eight weeks on a very low calorie diet of around 600 to 700 calories a day, followed by a less radical six-month weight control diet, led to significant improvement in blood glucose levels in 12 people. These findings are Read More


Mindfulness may be effective for treating lower back pain

“Meditation could ease the agony of back pain, a study suggests,” the Daily Mirror reports. A US study compared a technique called mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) with usual care and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for long-term non-specific lower back pain. The term “non-specific” refers to when there are no obvious causes, such as a slipped disc. MBSR is based on yoga Read More


Embryos with defective cells ‘can still develop healthily’

“Abnormal cells not a sure sign of baby defects,” reports The Telegraph following the publication of a study on the development of healthy embryos. Embryos containing cells with an abnormal number of chromosomes can still develop into healthy babies, according to researchers from the University of Cambridge. Embryo cells with too many or too few chromosomes can give rise to Read More


Can HRT in early menopause cut heart disease risk?

“Women who take HRT drugs soon after going through menopause are ‘less likely to suffer heart disease’,” the Daily Mail reports. A new study found that early adopters ofhormone replacement therapy (HRT) might slow their progression towardatherosclerosis (hardening and thickening of the arteries) which can increase the risk ofheart disease, heart attacks or strokes. However, the study in question did not follow Read More


Study argues ditching butter for veg oil won’t prevent heart disease

“Ditching butter for veg oil may not be better for heart,” the Daily Mail reports. An analysis of previously unpublished data from the 1960s and 70s found no benefit in replacing sources of saturated fats with vegetable oils. The original study was conducted from 1968 to 1973 in six US psychiatric state hospitals and a nursing home. People were randomly assigned to Read More


Would you trust a smartphone app as a contraceptive?

“An innovative new app might provide a more effective form of birth control than the contraceptive pill,” The Sun reports. The Natural Cycles fertility app combines the use of a thermometer to measure body temperature with calendar calculating methods – often referred to as the rhythm method – to work out the days when a woman would be at high Read More


Zika virus ‘does cause birth defects’

“The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention … has confirmed that the Zika virus causes severe birth defects,” BBC News reports. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has concluded that “a causal relationship exists between prenatal Zika virus infection and microcephaly”, where babies are born with unusually small heads and brains. The media coverage explains that despite Read More


‘Dying of heartache?’ Heart problems linked to bereavement

“You can die of a broken heart, study indicates,” The Guardian reports. The study found that people who lost a partner – especially if the death was unexpected – had an increased risk of developing an irregular heartbeat up to a year after the death. The study specifically looked at a type of heart condition called atrial fibrillation that causes an Read More